WordPress static content generator

Lately, I’ve been really interested in generating static content. Most websites out there are based on a CMS, WordPress going for 20% of all known websites, reason why I decided that would be useful to have a WordPress static content generator. There are a lot of solutions out there for generating static content and some have an option of importing your WordPress content, but I wanted to see how this can be done. Continue reading “WordPress static content generator”

E-mail server configuration – through trial and error

E-mail server configuration can be a pain. Spam was and still is a big problem, especially due to its volume, being almost half the size of all e-mail sent globally. Automated services, filters, reputation monitors and blacklists made it harder for spam to get across in people’s inboxes. It also made it harder for e-mail servers to be accepted as “legitimate” – which is good because it raises the quality level and hardens the requirements, but on the other side, it gives debugging issues.  Continue reading “E-mail server configuration – through trial and error”

WordPress login attempts – observations and conclusions

According to some sources, WordPress  powers approximately 18.9% of all known websites. Not sure of the exact specifics and I don’t think it’s relevant to question them, but I think most people agree that a lot of websites are using WordPress. Which makes it a clear target for both mass and targeted online attacks. Given the fact that like with other software or systems, a lot of WordPress installations are poorly managed by their users from a security perspective, especially when it comes to updates and proper credentials, the ease of compromise increases attracting even more attackers. Continue reading “WordPress login attempts – observations and conclusions”